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odditiesoflife:

The World’s First Pictures of Snowflakes
In 1885 at the age of 20, Wilson Bentley was a farmer and a self-taught photographer who lived his entire life in the small town of Jericho in Vermont. He gave the world its first ever photograph of a snowflake. Bentley captured over 5,000 snowflakes, or more correctly snow crystals, on film. Despite the fact that he rarely left Jericho, thousands of Americans knew him as “The Snowflake Man” or simply “Snowflake Bentley”. Our belief that no two snowflakes are alike is true and was proved by Bentley’s work. The expression stems from a line in a 1925 report in which he remarked, “Every crystal was a masterpiece of design and no one design was ever repeated. When a snowflake melted, that design was forever lost.” 
It started with a microscope his mother gave him at the age 15 which opened up the world of the very small to young Wilson. A lover of winter, he made plans to use his microscope to view snowflakes. His initial investigations proved both fascinating and frustrating as he tried to observe the short-lived flakes. Wanting to share his discoveries, he began by sketching what he saw, accumulating several hundred sketches by his 17th birthday. When his father purchased a camera for his son, Wilson combined it with his microscope, and he went on to make his first successful photo micrograph of a snow crystal on January 15, 1885. odditiesoflife:

The World’s First Pictures of Snowflakes
In 1885 at the age of 20, Wilson Bentley was a farmer and a self-taught photographer who lived his entire life in the small town of Jericho in Vermont. He gave the world its first ever photograph of a snowflake. Bentley captured over 5,000 snowflakes, or more correctly snow crystals, on film. Despite the fact that he rarely left Jericho, thousands of Americans knew him as “The Snowflake Man” or simply “Snowflake Bentley”. Our belief that no two snowflakes are alike is true and was proved by Bentley’s work. The expression stems from a line in a 1925 report in which he remarked, “Every crystal was a masterpiece of design and no one design was ever repeated. When a snowflake melted, that design was forever lost.” 
It started with a microscope his mother gave him at the age 15 which opened up the world of the very small to young Wilson. A lover of winter, he made plans to use his microscope to view snowflakes. His initial investigations proved both fascinating and frustrating as he tried to observe the short-lived flakes. Wanting to share his discoveries, he began by sketching what he saw, accumulating several hundred sketches by his 17th birthday. When his father purchased a camera for his son, Wilson combined it with his microscope, and he went on to make his first successful photo micrograph of a snow crystal on January 15, 1885. odditiesoflife:

The World’s First Pictures of Snowflakes
In 1885 at the age of 20, Wilson Bentley was a farmer and a self-taught photographer who lived his entire life in the small town of Jericho in Vermont. He gave the world its first ever photograph of a snowflake. Bentley captured over 5,000 snowflakes, or more correctly snow crystals, on film. Despite the fact that he rarely left Jericho, thousands of Americans knew him as “The Snowflake Man” or simply “Snowflake Bentley”. Our belief that no two snowflakes are alike is true and was proved by Bentley’s work. The expression stems from a line in a 1925 report in which he remarked, “Every crystal was a masterpiece of design and no one design was ever repeated. When a snowflake melted, that design was forever lost.” 
It started with a microscope his mother gave him at the age 15 which opened up the world of the very small to young Wilson. A lover of winter, he made plans to use his microscope to view snowflakes. His initial investigations proved both fascinating and frustrating as he tried to observe the short-lived flakes. Wanting to share his discoveries, he began by sketching what he saw, accumulating several hundred sketches by his 17th birthday. When his father purchased a camera for his son, Wilson combined it with his microscope, and he went on to make his first successful photo micrograph of a snow crystal on January 15, 1885. odditiesoflife:

The World’s First Pictures of Snowflakes
In 1885 at the age of 20, Wilson Bentley was a farmer and a self-taught photographer who lived his entire life in the small town of Jericho in Vermont. He gave the world its first ever photograph of a snowflake. Bentley captured over 5,000 snowflakes, or more correctly snow crystals, on film. Despite the fact that he rarely left Jericho, thousands of Americans knew him as “The Snowflake Man” or simply “Snowflake Bentley”. Our belief that no two snowflakes are alike is true and was proved by Bentley’s work. The expression stems from a line in a 1925 report in which he remarked, “Every crystal was a masterpiece of design and no one design was ever repeated. When a snowflake melted, that design was forever lost.” 
It started with a microscope his mother gave him at the age 15 which opened up the world of the very small to young Wilson. A lover of winter, he made plans to use his microscope to view snowflakes. His initial investigations proved both fascinating and frustrating as he tried to observe the short-lived flakes. Wanting to share his discoveries, he began by sketching what he saw, accumulating several hundred sketches by his 17th birthday. When his father purchased a camera for his son, Wilson combined it with his microscope, and he went on to make his first successful photo micrograph of a snow crystal on January 15, 1885. odditiesoflife:

The World’s First Pictures of Snowflakes
In 1885 at the age of 20, Wilson Bentley was a farmer and a self-taught photographer who lived his entire life in the small town of Jericho in Vermont. He gave the world its first ever photograph of a snowflake. Bentley captured over 5,000 snowflakes, or more correctly snow crystals, on film. Despite the fact that he rarely left Jericho, thousands of Americans knew him as “The Snowflake Man” or simply “Snowflake Bentley”. Our belief that no two snowflakes are alike is true and was proved by Bentley’s work. The expression stems from a line in a 1925 report in which he remarked, “Every crystal was a masterpiece of design and no one design was ever repeated. When a snowflake melted, that design was forever lost.” 
It started with a microscope his mother gave him at the age 15 which opened up the world of the very small to young Wilson. A lover of winter, he made plans to use his microscope to view snowflakes. His initial investigations proved both fascinating and frustrating as he tried to observe the short-lived flakes. Wanting to share his discoveries, he began by sketching what he saw, accumulating several hundred sketches by his 17th birthday. When his father purchased a camera for his son, Wilson combined it with his microscope, and he went on to make his first successful photo micrograph of a snow crystal on January 15, 1885. odditiesoflife:

The World’s First Pictures of Snowflakes
In 1885 at the age of 20, Wilson Bentley was a farmer and a self-taught photographer who lived his entire life in the small town of Jericho in Vermont. He gave the world its first ever photograph of a snowflake. Bentley captured over 5,000 snowflakes, or more correctly snow crystals, on film. Despite the fact that he rarely left Jericho, thousands of Americans knew him as “The Snowflake Man” or simply “Snowflake Bentley”. Our belief that no two snowflakes are alike is true and was proved by Bentley’s work. The expression stems from a line in a 1925 report in which he remarked, “Every crystal was a masterpiece of design and no one design was ever repeated. When a snowflake melted, that design was forever lost.” 
It started with a microscope his mother gave him at the age 15 which opened up the world of the very small to young Wilson. A lover of winter, he made plans to use his microscope to view snowflakes. His initial investigations proved both fascinating and frustrating as he tried to observe the short-lived flakes. Wanting to share his discoveries, he began by sketching what he saw, accumulating several hundred sketches by his 17th birthday. When his father purchased a camera for his son, Wilson combined it with his microscope, and he went on to make his first successful photo micrograph of a snow crystal on January 15, 1885. odditiesoflife:

The World’s First Pictures of Snowflakes
In 1885 at the age of 20, Wilson Bentley was a farmer and a self-taught photographer who lived his entire life in the small town of Jericho in Vermont. He gave the world its first ever photograph of a snowflake. Bentley captured over 5,000 snowflakes, or more correctly snow crystals, on film. Despite the fact that he rarely left Jericho, thousands of Americans knew him as “The Snowflake Man” or simply “Snowflake Bentley”. Our belief that no two snowflakes are alike is true and was proved by Bentley’s work. The expression stems from a line in a 1925 report in which he remarked, “Every crystal was a masterpiece of design and no one design was ever repeated. When a snowflake melted, that design was forever lost.” 
It started with a microscope his mother gave him at the age 15 which opened up the world of the very small to young Wilson. A lover of winter, he made plans to use his microscope to view snowflakes. His initial investigations proved both fascinating and frustrating as he tried to observe the short-lived flakes. Wanting to share his discoveries, he began by sketching what he saw, accumulating several hundred sketches by his 17th birthday. When his father purchased a camera for his son, Wilson combined it with his microscope, and he went on to make his first successful photo micrograph of a snow crystal on January 15, 1885.

odditiesoflife:

The World’s First Pictures of Snowflakes

In 1885 at the age of 20, Wilson Bentley was a farmer and a self-taught photographer who lived his entire life in the small town of Jericho in Vermont. He gave the world its first ever photograph of a snowflake. Bentley captured over 5,000 snowflakes, or more correctly snow crystals, on film. Despite the fact that he rarely left Jericho, thousands of Americans knew him as “The Snowflake Man” or simply “Snowflake Bentley”. Our belief that no two snowflakes are alike is true and was proved by Bentley’s work. The expression stems from a line in a 1925 report in which he remarked, “Every crystal was a masterpiece of design and no one design was ever repeated. When a snowflake melted, that design was forever lost.”

It started with a microscope his mother gave him at the age 15 which opened up the world of the very small to young Wilson. A lover of winter, he made plans to use his microscope to view snowflakes. His initial investigations proved both fascinating and frustrating as he tried to observe the short-lived flakes. Wanting to share his discoveries, he began by sketching what he saw, accumulating several hundred sketches by his 17th birthday. When his father purchased a camera for his son, Wilson combined it with his microscope, and he went on to make his first successful photo micrograph of a snow crystal on January 15, 1885.

(via turtlezepp)

scinerds:

Incredibly Small: Best Microscope Photos of the Year

(Click each image for short details)


  Every year for nearly four decades, Nikon has received hundreds of entries in its Small World microscope photography contest. Every year, the images are more amazing, and this year’s winners — selected from nearly 2,000 submissions — are undoubtedly the best yet.
  
  Super-close-ups of garlic, snail fossils, stinging nettle, bat embryos, bone cancer and a ladybug are among the top images this year. The first place winner (above) shows the blood-brain barrier in a living zebrafish embryo, which Nikon believes is the first image ever to show the formation of this barrier in a live animal.
  
  “We used fluorescent proteins to look at brain endothelial cells and watched the blood-brain barrier develop in real-time,” the winners, Jennifer Peters and Michael Taylor of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, in Memphis, said in a press release. “We took a 3-dimensional snapshot under a confocal microscope. Then, we stacked the images and compressed them into one – pseudo coloring them in rainbow to illustrate depth.”
  
  Here are the top 20 photomicrographs from the 38th Nikon Small World competition, selected for their originality, informational content, and visual impact by a panel of scientists, journalists and optical imaging experts. — Continue over at WiredScience
scinerds:

Incredibly Small: Best Microscope Photos of the Year

(Click each image for short details)


  Every year for nearly four decades, Nikon has received hundreds of entries in its Small World microscope photography contest. Every year, the images are more amazing, and this year’s winners — selected from nearly 2,000 submissions — are undoubtedly the best yet.
  
  Super-close-ups of garlic, snail fossils, stinging nettle, bat embryos, bone cancer and a ladybug are among the top images this year. The first place winner (above) shows the blood-brain barrier in a living zebrafish embryo, which Nikon believes is the first image ever to show the formation of this barrier in a live animal.
  
  “We used fluorescent proteins to look at brain endothelial cells and watched the blood-brain barrier develop in real-time,” the winners, Jennifer Peters and Michael Taylor of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, in Memphis, said in a press release. “We took a 3-dimensional snapshot under a confocal microscope. Then, we stacked the images and compressed them into one – pseudo coloring them in rainbow to illustrate depth.”
  
  Here are the top 20 photomicrographs from the 38th Nikon Small World competition, selected for their originality, informational content, and visual impact by a panel of scientists, journalists and optical imaging experts. — Continue over at WiredScience
scinerds:

Incredibly Small: Best Microscope Photos of the Year

(Click each image for short details)


  Every year for nearly four decades, Nikon has received hundreds of entries in its Small World microscope photography contest. Every year, the images are more amazing, and this year’s winners — selected from nearly 2,000 submissions — are undoubtedly the best yet.
  
  Super-close-ups of garlic, snail fossils, stinging nettle, bat embryos, bone cancer and a ladybug are among the top images this year. The first place winner (above) shows the blood-brain barrier in a living zebrafish embryo, which Nikon believes is the first image ever to show the formation of this barrier in a live animal.
  
  “We used fluorescent proteins to look at brain endothelial cells and watched the blood-brain barrier develop in real-time,” the winners, Jennifer Peters and Michael Taylor of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, in Memphis, said in a press release. “We took a 3-dimensional snapshot under a confocal microscope. Then, we stacked the images and compressed them into one – pseudo coloring them in rainbow to illustrate depth.”
  
  Here are the top 20 photomicrographs from the 38th Nikon Small World competition, selected for their originality, informational content, and visual impact by a panel of scientists, journalists and optical imaging experts. — Continue over at WiredScience
scinerds:

Incredibly Small: Best Microscope Photos of the Year

(Click each image for short details)


  Every year for nearly four decades, Nikon has received hundreds of entries in its Small World microscope photography contest. Every year, the images are more amazing, and this year’s winners — selected from nearly 2,000 submissions — are undoubtedly the best yet.
  
  Super-close-ups of garlic, snail fossils, stinging nettle, bat embryos, bone cancer and a ladybug are among the top images this year. The first place winner (above) shows the blood-brain barrier in a living zebrafish embryo, which Nikon believes is the first image ever to show the formation of this barrier in a live animal.
  
  “We used fluorescent proteins to look at brain endothelial cells and watched the blood-brain barrier develop in real-time,” the winners, Jennifer Peters and Michael Taylor of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, in Memphis, said in a press release. “We took a 3-dimensional snapshot under a confocal microscope. Then, we stacked the images and compressed them into one – pseudo coloring them in rainbow to illustrate depth.”
  
  Here are the top 20 photomicrographs from the 38th Nikon Small World competition, selected for their originality, informational content, and visual impact by a panel of scientists, journalists and optical imaging experts. — Continue over at WiredScience
scinerds:

Incredibly Small: Best Microscope Photos of the Year

(Click each image for short details)


  Every year for nearly four decades, Nikon has received hundreds of entries in its Small World microscope photography contest. Every year, the images are more amazing, and this year’s winners — selected from nearly 2,000 submissions — are undoubtedly the best yet.
  
  Super-close-ups of garlic, snail fossils, stinging nettle, bat embryos, bone cancer and a ladybug are among the top images this year. The first place winner (above) shows the blood-brain barrier in a living zebrafish embryo, which Nikon believes is the first image ever to show the formation of this barrier in a live animal.
  
  “We used fluorescent proteins to look at brain endothelial cells and watched the blood-brain barrier develop in real-time,” the winners, Jennifer Peters and Michael Taylor of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, in Memphis, said in a press release. “We took a 3-dimensional snapshot under a confocal microscope. Then, we stacked the images and compressed them into one – pseudo coloring them in rainbow to illustrate depth.”
  
  Here are the top 20 photomicrographs from the 38th Nikon Small World competition, selected for their originality, informational content, and visual impact by a panel of scientists, journalists and optical imaging experts. — Continue over at WiredScience
scinerds:

Incredibly Small: Best Microscope Photos of the Year

(Click each image for short details)


  Every year for nearly four decades, Nikon has received hundreds of entries in its Small World microscope photography contest. Every year, the images are more amazing, and this year’s winners — selected from nearly 2,000 submissions — are undoubtedly the best yet.
  
  Super-close-ups of garlic, snail fossils, stinging nettle, bat embryos, bone cancer and a ladybug are among the top images this year. The first place winner (above) shows the blood-brain barrier in a living zebrafish embryo, which Nikon believes is the first image ever to show the formation of this barrier in a live animal.
  
  “We used fluorescent proteins to look at brain endothelial cells and watched the blood-brain barrier develop in real-time,” the winners, Jennifer Peters and Michael Taylor of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, in Memphis, said in a press release. “We took a 3-dimensional snapshot under a confocal microscope. Then, we stacked the images and compressed them into one – pseudo coloring them in rainbow to illustrate depth.”
  
  Here are the top 20 photomicrographs from the 38th Nikon Small World competition, selected for their originality, informational content, and visual impact by a panel of scientists, journalists and optical imaging experts. — Continue over at WiredScience
scinerds:

Incredibly Small: Best Microscope Photos of the Year

(Click each image for short details)


  Every year for nearly four decades, Nikon has received hundreds of entries in its Small World microscope photography contest. Every year, the images are more amazing, and this year’s winners — selected from nearly 2,000 submissions — are undoubtedly the best yet.
  
  Super-close-ups of garlic, snail fossils, stinging nettle, bat embryos, bone cancer and a ladybug are among the top images this year. The first place winner (above) shows the blood-brain barrier in a living zebrafish embryo, which Nikon believes is the first image ever to show the formation of this barrier in a live animal.
  
  “We used fluorescent proteins to look at brain endothelial cells and watched the blood-brain barrier develop in real-time,” the winners, Jennifer Peters and Michael Taylor of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, in Memphis, said in a press release. “We took a 3-dimensional snapshot under a confocal microscope. Then, we stacked the images and compressed them into one – pseudo coloring them in rainbow to illustrate depth.”
  
  Here are the top 20 photomicrographs from the 38th Nikon Small World competition, selected for their originality, informational content, and visual impact by a panel of scientists, journalists and optical imaging experts. — Continue over at WiredScience

scinerds:

Incredibly Small: Best Microscope Photos of the Year

(Click each image for short details)

Every year for nearly four decades, Nikon has received hundreds of entries in its Small World microscope photography contest. Every year, the images are more amazing, and this year’s winners — selected from nearly 2,000 submissions — are undoubtedly the best yet.

Super-close-ups of garlic, snail fossils, stinging nettle, bat embryos, bone cancer and a ladybug are among the top images this year. The first place winner (above) shows the blood-brain barrier in a living zebrafish embryo, which Nikon believes is the first image ever to show the formation of this barrier in a live animal.

“We used fluorescent proteins to look at brain endothelial cells and watched the blood-brain barrier develop in real-time,” the winners, Jennifer Peters and Michael Taylor of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, in Memphis, said in a press release. “We took a 3-dimensional snapshot under a confocal microscope. Then, we stacked the images and compressed them into one – pseudo coloring them in rainbow to illustrate depth.”

Here are the top 20 photomicrographs from the 38th Nikon Small World competition, selected for their originality, informational content, and visual impact by a panel of scientists, journalists and optical imaging experts. — Continue over at WiredScience

(via turtlezepp)

vividified:

“All the naysayers who were against marijuana legalization are eating crow right about now. Colorado’s weed sales just keep trending up, and with the sales of legal weed, they are improving their schools and reducing overall crime rates.”
Link to Article
vividified:

“All the naysayers who were against marijuana legalization are eating crow right about now. Colorado’s weed sales just keep trending up, and with the sales of legal weed, they are improving their schools and reducing overall crime rates.”
Link to Article

vividified:

All the naysayers who were against marijuana legalization are eating crow right about now. Colorado’s weed sales just keep trending up, and with the sales of legal weed, they are improving their schools and reducing overall crime rates.”

Link to Article

(via michellachipotle)

reddlr-earthporn:

Auroras over Northern Canada [1500×1000]